4    The Public Meaning of Heritage


Module I

The Public Meaning of Archeological Heritage

 

classroom seminar

 

Goals

    Overview of heritage

    Historical perspectives

    Ethical and legal standards

 

Lessons to Learn

    The concept of heritage

    Natural and cultural resources as heritage components

    Global, national, and local-regional heritage

    Compelling stories of archeological interpretation

    Inclusive, multiple perspectives

    Ethical and legal standards

 

Antietam, Maryland

Module I: The Public Meaning of Archeological Heritage

 

This section presents an overview of the topics and information presented in Module I: The Public Meaning of Archeological Heritage, which is designed to be presented in a classroom seminar of lectures and discussion. The concept of heritage used here focuses on the relationship between the uses of the past, local cultural expression, and the natural environment. National parks were selected on the basis of their natural resources, cultural resources, historical associations, or some combination of these factors. Therefore, it is important to understand the relationships between our natural and cultural heritage in learning how best to interpret them.

 

Goals

This module is designed to provide an overview of the current role of archaeological heritage in natural and cultural resource preservation, management, and development. It is intended to furnish broad and comparative perspectives on archeology and public interpretation and to consider multiple audiences for archaeological interpretation.

 

Content

Faculty and participants will discuss the interpretation of archeological resources in global, national, and local-regional contexts and examine why and how public education has become an important part of cultural resource stewardship. Participants will hear how archeological interpretation can incorporate inclusive, multiple perspectives. The seminar also will provide an overview of the ethical and legal standards for heritage management, archeology, and public interpretation.

 

Lessons to Learn

The lectures and discussions in this seminar are intended to provide participants with a broad framework for developing archeological interpretation strategies by focusing on the following elements:

 

The concept of heritage

Natural and cultural resources as heritage components

Global, national, and local-regional heritage

Compelling stories of archeological interpretation

Inclusive, multiple perspectives

Ethical standards and legal context

 

These lessons are intended to provide participants with a broad-based framework for completing the archeological interpretation training program.

 
 

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An Inspiring Guide

I. Introduction

II. Overview of the Program

III. Meeting the Mission

IV. The Public Meaning of Archeological Heritage

V. Archeology and Interpretation

VI. Study Tour of Parks

VII. Interpretive Products

VIII. Credits

IX. References

X. Resources and Links

 

National Park Service  - Archeology and Ethnography Program  - Distance Learning

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